Ground Cherries

Physalis heterophyllas

I am have written this for educational purposes. If in doubt don’t, make certain you know your plants. This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such.

Most know them as ground cherries here in Pennsylvania. I have seen the amish plant these among their corn plants. They grow wild in many areas of the U.S. All parts of the plant are toxic except the berries when ripe. The berries are ripe when they turn yellow. They have a slight tart taste, I add them to salsa. If you have eaten a tomatilla then you will know what these taste like because the taste is pretty much the same but the tomatilla is much bigger. Some make pies and jelly from them. I eat them but have not gotten enough to make anything from them. The chipmunks eat them before I can pick them. Many say they taste best if you wait until they drop off the plant. I noticed no difference in taste from ones ripe on the plant and ones that have fallen from the plant.

Though the links are to different varieties of physalis the nutrient and chemical makeup of most of them are pretty much the same so just about any variety of them would have the benefits mentioned in these studies.

https://healthiersteps.com/all-about-ground-cherries/

https://northernhomestead.com/how-to-grow-and-use-ground-cherries/

 

Reduces colitis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26221001

Fights cancer

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5871299/

Most all of them even tomatillas contain withanolides. Which fight cancer and inflammation.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/np400953n

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4177291/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5481415/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3762585/

Helps protect the liver.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278691514004141?via%3Dihub

Often times in chronic illness glutathione production is inhibited and quinone levels can become very high. Physalis group of plants have phytochemicals that can increase glutathione and the enzyme needed to reduce quinone.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4883085/

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