Benefits of melatonin.

Written by Lee Stevenson

This is not medical advice , I am writing this for educational purposes. If you are ill please seek the aid of an experienced and knowledgeable functional medicine practitioner.

Melatonin

Melatonin has so many benefits I may not be able to describe them all. One thing to take note of with melatonin if your vitamin D levels are low it will actually disrupt your sleep and possibly cause nighmare. When vitamin D levels are adequate it promotes deep restful sleep and does not cause nightmares. If taken it should be taken about and hour before bed time. Melatonin can help restore the bodies circadian rhythm . Melatonin improves mood and prevents depression. Low melatonin increases the risk of breast cancer. Melatonin improves cardiovascular health. Melatonin is a very potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant. It has been found to help reduce symptoms of autoimmunity and sepsis. Melatonin improves the function of the immune system. Melatonin helps to prevent over active bladder and muscle spasms. Melatonin increases the bladders capacity. Melatonin removes free radicals from the body. Melatonin prevents mitochondrial leakage which prevents the production of free radicals. Meltonin stimulates the release of antioxidant enzymes. Meltonin increases G6PD which is often times low in those with Lyme disease or who have consumed foods high in glyphosate. Melatonin inhibits the negative effects of endotoxins. Melatonin improves the health of the liver and kidney. Meltonin protects the brain and nerves from injury. Melatonin improves lung health and prevents allergies. Melatonin reduces NLRP3 expression which is overexpressed in autoimmunity, Crohn’s disease and interstitial cystitis. Melatonin alleviates the symptoms of Alzheimers disease and protects the brain from injury. The improvement of mitochondrial function by melatonin helps protect from viral infection and has been shown to protect from Covid. Melatonin also prevents viruses from entering the cells. Melatonin speeds up recovery from sepsis.

Before taking melatonin a person has to make sure they are not deficient in vitamin D which studies show most are. Vitamin D deficiency makes a person extremely susceptible to infection. A person should not take more then 5000 IU of vitamin D a day. If a person is deficient in vitamin D then they will react negatively to melatonin and it will cause disrupted sleep patterns instead of enhancing sleep.
Melatonin is an extremely potent antioxidant and it protects the mitochondria from oxidative stress. Melatonin is antiaging. This increases cellular ATP levels and enhances mitochondrial membraine potential meaning it is easier for the mitochondria to clean the bad out while transporting into the mitochondria the things needed. Melatonin is so important for mitochondria health that the mitochondria produces it’s own melatonin. If oxidative phosphorylation becomes inhibited or damaged many free radicals are formed causing the mitochondria to function even more poorly. Melatonin prevents this from happening. When oxidative phosphorylation is inhibited diabetes and obesity can occur. If melatonin is not the most potent antioxidant it is sure up there at the top in it’s power to reduce free radicals.
Melatonin has been found to protect from the harm infection like corona can cause. Melatonin reduces the outbreak of herpes and helps prevent the damage that occurs from herpes virus infections.

Taking extremely high doses can cause nausea, dizziness, headache, lethargy, sleepiness, disorientation and decreased motor skills. It should not be taken during waking hours. It can delay puberty in children because it inhibits prolactin production. It also inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons which could also delay puberty.

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5409706/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8300798/

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8207287/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7582936/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8190272/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5387000/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2993480/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11121726/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6017324/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8301107/

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