Plantain Herb

 

 

Plantago Major and Plantago Lanceolata

Most call P. Major broad leaf plantain and P. Lanceolata narrow leaf plantain. The health benefits are similar but P. Major taste much better though I like the taste of both, I prefer P. Major. Or P Rugelii which looks similar to P. Major but it has a purple or red color at the bottom of the leaf stem. It is the mildest tasting of the three and has a somewhat sweet taste. This is another herb that is a power house when it comes to healing. It can help balance the immune system. Helps with inflammation and poor blood circulation. Kills many pathogens and has amazing healing abilities. It can kill gangrene so the phytochemicals are being researched in it. It also fights chronic illnesses even cancer. I have found it works fantastic for rashes especially poison ivy. To prevent a rash I will take Jewel Weed and use the juices because it is good at breaking up the urishiol. It doesn’t prevent the rash though but will reduce the effects of the urishiol in poison ivy or poison sumac. I then use the juice from plantain to prevent the a rash. It contains biacalein which is what give sculletaria it’s healing benefits.

https://www.ediblewildfood.com/rugels-plantain.aspx

https://wellnessmama.com/4638/plantain-herb-profile/

Cancer

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29710521

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28839362

Speeds up the healing of wounds and prevents infection.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29575942

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25244603

Protects the renal system from inflammation.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29632849

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29507272

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28335408

It also protects our bodies from oxidative stress which is the cause of chronic illness.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27514764

The many benefits are listed in this study.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5878035/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29028587

It contians biacalein and aucubin. This gives it many healing abilities along with the ability to fight pathogens. Biacalein has been shown to reverse some injury to the cardiovascular system and the lungs.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26618515

Contains oligosaccharides (mucilage) which help balance gut bacteria and heal the gut.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28704184

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10399303

The seeds have the most mucilage and really helped heal my gut. The seeds are what most know as physillium.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27702546

Wild Sarsparilla

 

Aralia Nudicaulis

Please make certain you know a plant before using it. If in doubt don’t. This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such.

I have eaten the leaves of wild sarsparilla they do not have much flavor. The roots I have made tea with and I do not think the tea tasted very good but it does have many health benefits. This is in the same family as Panax Gensing and has many of the same chemical properties which means it is adaptogenic.

http://foragenortheast.com/plants/s-t/sarsaparilla-wild/

It is in the same family as gensing so has many of the same properties.

http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/woodland/plants/wild_sarsaparilla.htm

Phytochemicals.

http://doctorschar.com/false-sarsaparilla-aralia-nudicaulis/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26669092

Fights cancer

http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/26/3A/2157.long

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17034664

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16827159

Fights mycoplasma

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22234257

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4981992/

Golden Rod

Solidago Canadensis

Golden Rod has a peppery taste. I have eaten the root when young and it is tasty but not so tasty when it gets older. It has great detoxing and antibiotic properties. It helps reduce coughing. Most only eat the leaves and flowers. I do know it must kill tick born illness because when I first drank tea made from it I herxed very bad.

https://www.ediblewildfood.com/goldenrod.aspx

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23041666

http://ndnr.com/autoimmuneallergy-medicine/solidago-an-inflammation-modulator/

https://www.stlukes-stl.com/health-content/medicine/33/000251.htm

In low doses in increases reactive oxygen species and in high doses it lowers them.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23848059

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16451754

Phytochemicals.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22007910

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23600612

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11985846

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10190971

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1367338

Has antibacterial properties

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3979189/

Inhibits cancer growth.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15519169

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3894524/

Smilax

Smilax

This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such. I am posting this for informational and educational purposes only. If in doubt don’t get to know a plant and it’s safety before using it.

There are many plants in the Smilax family in my area which is the eastern part of the United States. The ones I am familiar with are S. Ecirrhata, and S. Tamnoides. S. Tamnoides has briars on them that really hurt when jagged by them. We also have S. Glauca, S. Herbaceous, S. Rotundifolia, S. Pulverulenta, and S. Pseudochina in my area. I have eaten the leaves and like the taste. Many say the young shoots taste like asparagus. I have never eaten the roots but they are edible.

http://floridahillbilly.com/smilax-a-backyard-wild-edible/

http://www.eattheweeds.com/smilax-a-brier-and-thats-no-bull/

Most of them have the same phytochemicals that I am familiar with so they will be the ones I list studies on.

Has anti allergy properties.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26387391

fights cancer

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4351248/

http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/content/8/5/464.long

http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/20/12/19890

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26607178

http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/content/8/5/464.long

Reduces inflammation

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25817687

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4363603/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5585559/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4244943/

Helps with pelvic inflammatory disease.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23353177

Protects against myocardial hypertrophy.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25926285

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23954280

Cardioprotective

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24953033

Has antimicrobial properties.

http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/18/5/5265

May have hepaprotective effects.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23681353

Contain Astilbin which is renal protective.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19644810

Contains steroidal saponins. Which has antifungal, and anti inflammatory.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5507813/

Protects from lead poisoning.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20580805

Reduces oxidative stress.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4244943/

Contains taxifolin which has many health benefits. It is also known as dihydroquerciten. Too many benefits to list here.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12016952

Fights herpes and other viruses

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf030837o

https://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0192415X08005692?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16375860

Helps with gout

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24140588

Wild Yam

 

 

Dioscoria Villosa

This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such. I am posting this for educational and informational purposes only. Please be careful make sure you know a plant before you use it.

Known as Wild Yam. I have tasted it, it is not to bad. The leaves and root contain estrogen like chemicals and have steroidal like properties. This one has been found to have many benefits for women. There are hundreds of varieties of Discoria and many of them have similar phytochemicals. The most common one found in North America is D Villosa. There is one from China that grows a bigger root. D Villosa is the one I grow. It contains diosgenin which is an estrogen like chemical.

https://draxe.com/wild-yam/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3935402/

Helps with menstruation and and female fertility.

http://natural-fertility-info.com/reproductive-system-support-for-women-with-wild-yam.html

Has steroidal type properties.

https://www.herbs2000.com/homeopathy/dioscorea.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5592723/

The leaves have antioxidants and do not taste that bad.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29731440

Has steroid like properties which reduces pain and inflammation.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3734200/

Helps with breast cancer.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003986115301120?via%3Dihub

Helps with hyperglycemia

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24607838

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4162539/

Not certain of this study haven’t seen others. Claims over consumption can cause kidney fibrosis.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278691508003748?via%3Dihub

Can inhibit bone loss.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3913014/

Here is a recent study showing diosgenin fights cancer, inflammation, increases thickness of skin, has antibiotic properties, helps with diabetes, helps with thrombosis (blood clotting), and is and anticoagulant. Has cardioprotective properties.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5225340/

Prevents oxalates.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0009279714002658?via%3Dihub

Velvet Leaf Plant

Abutilon Theophrasti

This is not medical advice I am posting this for information and educational purposes and should not be taken as medical advice. If in doubt don’t make certain of a plant before you use it.

I have eaten the seeds but no other parts. This plant is new to me. I know it is Roundup ready because I have seen it in field that had been sprayed by Glyphosate containing products so be careful where you forage it. They can overtake a crop and can reduce production. The fiber is used to make rope. I have seen sites that claimed the seeds can remain viable in the soil for many many years. So when I forage them for the seeds I pull the whole plant out because I get them from a friend who grows his crops organically and uses no harmful chemicals.

http://www.eattheweeds.com/velvet-leaf-fiber-and-food/

https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/species/abutilon/theophrasti/

The leaves have antioxidant, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. The leaves also reduce hydroxy radicals.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5872602/

http://www.ptfarm.pl/pub/File/Acta_Poloniae/2017/3/881.pdf

Contain Hibiscuslide C which is antifungal.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23816874

The flowers are high in flavoniods.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16161355

Purslane a super food.

 

 

Portulaca Oleracea

Purslane is a super food it has almost all the nutrients the body needs including fats needed by the body. It is slightly tangy in the morning but after the sun has hit it the tangyness goes away and it has a nutty flavor when cooked. I love it raw in salads and it is great in stir fries. It is very high in mucilage so can be used to thicken soups. It is an unusual plant because when broken off the detach branch can form seeds. It is one of my favorites and I grow it in big quantities because of the many uses it has.

http://www.ediblewildfood.com/purslane.aspx

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/vegetable/purslane.html

It has many health benefits, it is anti ulcerative, fights cancer, reduces oxidative stress, helps with diabetes, fights cancer, and reduces inflammation.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4321094/

It stimulates insulin secretion.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5974063/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29514130

It enhances glucose uptake.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29341802

Fights inflammation.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29685654

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27396870

Is hepaprotective.

http://www.eurekaselect.com/160877/article

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5749558/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4399094/

Helps with colitis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29579933

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4891426/

Enhances cognitive function.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28363525

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19879120

Reduces lung inflammation.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641415/

Contains Alpha Linolenic Acid and Omega 3 fatty acids.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28732439

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934766/

Fights cancer.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28714363

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27911090

Helps with asthma.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5316266/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4376287/

Is neuroprotective.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5126344/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27731637

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0001-37652016005010109&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en

Hmmm same thing that is used in vaccines is used to damage the brains of rats. Well Purslane helps with that also.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26563420

Reduces blood pressure.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26854844

antimicrobial.

http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/20/9/16375

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26904730

Inhibits hepatitis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25871297

Helps with osteoporosis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4501198/

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/bpb/38/1/38_b14-00567/_article

Reduces oxLDL

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25442258

Fights fatigue.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25296504

The list of benefits goes on and on. It is one amazing plant.

Wild Violet

Viola

This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such. It is for information and educational purposes. If in doubt don’t make sure you know your plant before you use them.

Their are many species of wild violet but their nutrients and phytochemistry is pretty much the same.

Viola Biflora, Viola Canina, Viola, V. Labradorica, V. Odorata, V. Rostrata, and V. Sororia are the ones I am familiar with. They all taste the same to me. I love them it is one of my favorite wild edibles. I could eat wild violets daily. They have similar nutrients as dandelion only higher levels of them.

http://www.ediblewildfood.com/wild-violet.aspx

https://thesurvivalmom.com/enjoy-wild-violets/

The viola species have hepaprotective properties.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5217637/

They reduce inflammation and an over active immune system.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3918579/

Reduces coughing

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25954025

Phytochemicals that are good for the heart and oxidative stress.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23035206

Reduces oxidative stress.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4967839/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26751970

Is nueroprotective.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27516984

Anti inflammatory.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17983197

Fights cancer

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4163403/

Fight bacterial infections.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20558471

Reduces histamines

http://www.thepab.org/files/2017/March-2017/PAB-MS-160199.pdf

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874113005941

Is high in mucilage which heals the gut. It is so high that when I make tinctures they come out like a gel.

https://thenaturopathicherbalist.com/herbs/v-z/viola-tricolor/

Lemon Balm

Melissa Officinalis

This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such. If in doubt don’t if you do not know a plant do not use it.

Lemon Balm is good for soothing the stomach and for relaxing. It has also been shown to be good for making a balm for herpes chancres. Improves blood sugar levels, also helps with getting restful sleep. Has been shown to protect the brain cells.

https://thenerdyfarmwife.com/12-things-to-do-with-lemon-balm/

https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/9-benefits-of-lemon-balm/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3230760/

Helps fight viruses even herpes.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24817544

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5613005/

Safe to consume in large quantities.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4433273/

Is good at treating and preventing oxidative stress.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5871149/

It helps with ventricular arrhythmia.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5586902/

Has been shown to help with heart palpitations.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874115000781?via%3Dihub

Has antimicrobial properties.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20201279

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26075899

The flavonoids found in Lemon Balm along with other herbs have antidepressant properties.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5829422/

Fights cancer

http://journal.waocp.org/?sid=Entrez:PubMed&id=pmid:26320439&key=2015.16.14.5703

Phytochemicals

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26495650

Reduces premenstrual symptoms.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4557408/

Improves cognitive function.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1738567/

Has been shown to reduce histamines.

http://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1342&context=ebl

Fleabane

 

Erigeron Annuus and Erigeron Philadelphica

I am have written this for educational purposes. If in doubt don’t, make certain you know your plants. This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such.

Known as daisy fleabane. They look very similar and have the same taste and health benefits. They are difficult to tell apart and I often confuse them. So I am not sure which I have picutures of but I like the peppery taste. The older they get the hotter they get. The flowers and roots are very hot almost as hot as a habenaro but the burning does not last as long. It taste like for hot black pepper. The younger the plant the milder it is. Many claim you should not eat the roots.

https://www.ediblewildfood.com/daisy-fleabane.aspx

Has been shown to be effective against cancer and fungal infection.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21319704

Reduces inflammation

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3595701/

Phytochemicals in fleabane.

http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/14/7/2458

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/cpb/51/7/51_7_894/_article

Has neuroprotective properties.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3145603/

Helps prevent aging by inhibiting AGEs.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12272-001-1244-z

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/bpb/33/2/33_2_329/_article

Prevents damage from oxidative stress.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19557877

Contain pyromeconic acid which is very effective against the flu virus.

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/bbb1992/59/5/59_5_886/_article

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b00628

Ground Cherries

Physalis heterophyllas

I am have written this for educational purposes. If in doubt don’t, make certain you know your plants. This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such.

Most know them as ground cherries here in Pennsylvania. I have seen the amish plant these among their corn plants. They grow wild in many areas of the U.S. All parts of the plant are toxic except the berries when ripe. The berries are ripe when they turn yellow. They have a slight tart taste, I add them to salsa. If you have eaten a tomatilla then you will know what these taste like because the taste is pretty much the same but the tomatilla is much bigger. Some make pies and jelly from them. I eat them but have not gotten enough to make anything from them. The chipmunks eat them before I can pick them. Many say they taste best if you wait until they drop off the plant. I noticed no difference in taste from ones ripe on the plant and ones that have fallen from the plant.

Though the links are to different varieties of physalis the nutrient and chemical makeup of most of them are pretty much the same so just about any variety of them would have the benefits mentioned in these studies.

https://healthiersteps.com/all-about-ground-cherries/

https://northernhomestead.com/how-to-grow-and-use-ground-cherries/

 

Reduces colitis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26221001

Fights cancer

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5871299/

Most all of them even tomatillas contain withanolides. Which fight cancer and inflammation.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/np400953n

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4177291/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5481415/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3762585/

Helps protect the liver.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278691514004141?via%3Dihub

Often times in chronic illness glutathione production is inhibited and quinone levels can become very high. Physalis group of plants have phytochemicals that can increase glutathione and the enzyme needed to reduce quinone.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4883085/

Evening Primrose

 

 

Oenothera Biennis

I  have written this for educational purposes. If in doubt don’t, make certain you know your plants. This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such.

There are many health benefits to Evening Primrose. I found making a tea with the roots really helped in healing my gut. The roots are very high in mucilage. I found all parts of the plant to taste almost identical to ginger and even seem to have the same effects at reducing nausea from my herxing. I make teas from just about all parts of the plant and once in a while put the leaves in my salads.

https://www.ediblewildfood.com/evening-primrose.aspx

https://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-evening-primrose.html

Evening Primrose is very good at reducing inflammation.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jf304002h

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874112001420?via%3Dihub

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22819447

Has been shown to have cancer fighting qualities.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24491902

https://www.cancerletters.info/article/S0304-3835(04)00894-8/fulltext

Has been shown to reduce symptoms of menopause.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00404-013-2852-6

Silky Dogwood

 

 

Cornus Amomum

I  have written this for educational purposes. If in doubt don’t, make certain you know your plants. This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such.

Though there are many species of Cornus (dogwood) some can be toxic and some can be edible and the leaves and berries are used. The one I am familiar with is Silky Dogwood and I make tea from the leaves and I eat the berries which are plain tasting to me.

http://www.naturalmedicinalherbs.net/herbs/c/cornus-amomum=silky-dogwood.php

https://www.henriettes-herb.com/eclectic/sturtevant/cornus.html

http://edible.wikidot.com/edible-plant:136

The berries are high in quercetin.

http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI1491449/

The phytochemicals in the berries have been shown to fight cancer.

http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI1491449/