Horsweed

 

Conyza Canadensis

Used to be known as Erigeron Canadensis. It has a somewhat hot taste like black pepper. I like the taste but I think it is better to use as a spice. Many use it in place of tarragon. I do not know what tarragon taste like so cannot comment on that. I used to grow it now I try and manage it. It does not take much for it to get away from you and overtake things. Some call it Horseweed, some call it mares tail. Is resistant to glyphosate so be careful where you forage it.

https://www.ediblewildfood.com/horseweed.aspx

http://www.eattheweeds.com/conyza-canadensis-herb-fire-food-2/

It helps fight cancer and reduces oxidative stress.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26846256

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21294076

Kills flukes.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26695200

Phytochemicals, wow has some good ones.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23270230

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21954558

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/cpb/50/12/50_12_1558/_article

Has anti-inflammatory effects, possibly by upregulating heme oxygenase-1 expression.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4122705/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19521071

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3725873

Prevents blood clotting.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21172723

http://www.elis.sk/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=625&category_id=28&option=com_virtuemart&vmcchk=1&Itemid=1

Fights parasites and fungus.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22612410

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23049473

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21054146

Antibacterial.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22623891

Seems it may help with adrenal fatigue.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20121251

Reduces oxidative stress, and decreases CO2 generation in platelets.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16973495

Angelica

 

Angelica Archangelica

This is not medical advice it should not be taken as such. I am posting this for informational and educational purposes only. If in doubt do not use a plant if you are not certain of it’s safety or identification.

Angelica is related to carrots and celery so will taste similar. I have Angelica Archangelica and it has a mild celery like taste. Some species of Angelica can cause light sensitivity when eaten. A. Sylvestris is one of them. There are many toxic plants that look very similar so make certain you know this one before you even try to use it. Angelica has a husk like part close to where the stems meet. The one I am familiar with is Angelica Archangelica. It is the only one I have seen. It can get very tall, mine used to be then I cut it down. Every since I cut it down it has not recovered.

Identifying

https://wildfoodgirl.com/2011/angelica-enhances-alcohol-satisfies-sweet-tooth/

Each Angelica species has their own unique benefits. A. Archangelica has free radical scavenging properties, and strong antimicrobial properties and taste good to.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5620520/

https://supplementpolice.com/angelica-root-extract/

Reduces anxiety

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22960104

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23297567

Those with high acetycholine levels should not take it because it can slightly raise acetycholine levels.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21786787

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18069242

Leaves and stems are best for anxiety.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3942901/

Fights cancer

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15813373

http://iv.iiarjournals.org/content/19/1/191.long

Has hepatoprotective effects.

https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/69530

Prevents seizures

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3003174/

Prevents skin aging.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/php.12595

Inhibits herpes and coxsackie

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28487231

If there is poison Hemlock nearby don’t use it . There are claims Angelica and Hemlock can hybridize.

Evening Primrose

 

 

Oenothera Biennis

I  have written this for educational purposes. If in doubt don’t, make certain you know your plants. This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such.

There are many health benefits to Evening Primrose. I found making a tea with the roots really helped in healing my gut. The roots are very high in mucilage. I found all parts of the plant to taste almost identical to ginger and even seem to have the same effects at reducing nausea from my herxing. I make teas from just about all parts of the plant and once in a while put the leaves in my salads.

https://www.ediblewildfood.com/evening-primrose.aspx

https://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-evening-primrose.html

Evening Primrose is very good at reducing inflammation.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jf304002h

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874112001420?via%3Dihub

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22819447

Has been shown to have cancer fighting qualities.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24491902

https://www.cancerletters.info/article/S0304-3835(04)00894-8/fulltext

Has been shown to reduce symptoms of menopause.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00404-013-2852-6

Canadian Thistle

 

Cirsium Arvense

I  have written this for educational purposes. If in doubt don’t, make certain you know your plants. This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such.

Canadian Thistle has many benefits but is very invasive. I grow it but I keep it isolated and I cut the tops off before the seeds can spread. It is very very difficult to control if you let it go to seed. It can spread through seeds they are similar to dandelion and how they are dispersed. They also can spread through their roots which are very aggressive.

The leaves are edible but you must make sure you get the pricklys off. The roots are edible but if you eat too many they will make you gassy. It helped me a lot with my fight with Lyme. I do enjoy the taste but it is a lot of work getting the jaggy parts off the leaves. The roots have a lot of health benefits also. I like peeling the leaves downward. That removes many of the prickles from the stalk of the young plants, then I light crape it with a knife. Then I eat the stalk, it is a very good tasting vegetable. Has a very sweet taste and is very juicy.

http://www.eattheweeds.com/thistle-touch-me-not-but-add-butter-2/

 

https://plants.jstor.org/compilation/Cirsium.arvense

Canadian Thistle has great antiviral and antifungal properties.

http://www.medjchem.com/images/stories/PDFV1NO2/mjcirchad2.pdf

http://ojs.medjbio.com/index.php/medjchem/article/view/131

Canadian Thistle is a good source of antioxidants.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jfbc.12299

http://www.acgpubs.org/RNP/2018/Volume12/Issue%201/27-RNP-EO_1706-043.pdf

Teasel

Dipsacus Fullonum

I  have written this for educational purposes. If in doubt don’t, make certain you know your plants. This is not medical advice and should not be taken as such.

It is considered invasive in the US but I have not had a problem with it spreading because the deer and ground hogs love it. As a matter of fact because of that I have a difficult time getting it to grow. It is very high in nutrition, I love the taste of the leaves. First year roots are very tasty but second year roots are bitter and tough.

Teasel is amazing it helps with everything, tick born illness, cancer, osteoporosis. The list goes on and on. It really helped with my Lyme Disease. It is great at reducing inflammation. It helps with amyloidosis which can be caused by vaccine injury especially vaccines that contain aluminum. Glyphosate and other farm chemicals can cause it. Also infection can cause amyloid cyst to form. This is a list of the phytochemicals in teasels and what they do.

https://www.weiterbildung.uzh.ch/dam/jcr:a905e374-eab0-414c-be1d-e1fc63c7e5cc/Schlussarbeit.%20James%20Pollard.%20Final%20Copy.pdf

https://www.naturalmedicinefacts.info/plant/dipsacus-fullonum.html

This is one of the best sites for learning to identify plants and learn their uses.

https://www.ediblewildfood.com/teasel.aspx

Uses of teasel.

https://www.herbs2000.com/herbs/herbs_teasel.htm